Wednesday, February 1, 2023

CHS Briefs February 2023


The February Brief is also available at the Cavendish Historical Society blog. If you have questions, would like to volunteer with CHS, or have items for the CHS Cares Closet please e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com or call 802-226-7807.

 

2023 has started off on a sad note as we report the passing of Dan Churchill, CHS President and Treasurer on January 18th.

 

REMEMBERING DAN CHURCHILL: Born and raised in Proctorsville, at the age of 14 Dan became a “teenage pharmacist.” He worked for the Pollard’s store, until 1964, coming home on weekends from college to fill and compound prescriptions.  While he would have liked to make pharmacy his career, the family finances were such that he focused on his second love, electricity.

 

He remembered vividly when, as a young child, his house was wired. He found it fascinating and followed the technician from room to room. This ultimately resulted in his working for General Radio for four years while studying at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which led to his being an engineer at RCA for 25 years. 

 

In 1970, he started Commercial Radio Company to provide specialized expertise companies, universities, and individuals in need of service for radio transmitters and other apparatuses. Purchasing the old Duttonsville School in Cavendish, he refurbished the building to be his home and business. 

 

Upon returning to Cavendish, Dan became very involved in a variety of civic duties, including being a member of the Cavendish Select Board, Planning Commission,  Board of Civil Authorities, as well as the town’s representative on the boards of the Black River Senior Center and the area Agency on Aging. He was one of the founding members of CHS, as well as a member of the Masons. 

 

Among  Dan’s interests was dowsing and spiritual healing. He attended classes at Lily Dale and was a member of the American Society of Dowsers. Dan often did readings for community members as well as around the state. 

 

A man with many talents and interests, one person described Dan as “one of a kind eccentric genius and very kind.”

 

A memorial is being planned for Sunday, June 4, 2 pm at his home/business in Cavendish. The family requests donations  be made to the Cavendish Historical Society, PO Box 472, Cavendish VT 05142.

 

Our condolences to his daughter Centura, his brother Winston and to his nephews, their children and to his many friends.

 


FEBRUARY IS BLACK HISTORY MONTH:
 Cavendish has a strong abolitionist history. The Rev. Skinner, who was responsible for the Cavendish Stone Universalist Church, was a leader as were many others in town. Below are links that you may find interesting. 


Peter Tumbo/Tumber: Revolutionary War Veteran, Abolitionist & Former Slave: Dying in 1832 at the age of 106 (we doubt the age), Peter Tumbo lived in Cavendish for almost 40 years. We believe the name Tumbo reflects where he came from in W. Africa versus what his actual name was. It’s a fascinating piece of our history, which we are still working on. 

• Safe at Last in Cavendish: Includes information on John Brown, Rev Skinner and the abolitionist movement in town. It’s a story based on an oral history, that ended up leading us to a far more interesting aspect of town history. 

• John Brown in Cavendish 

• A letter regarding John Brown’s stay in Proctorsville

 

INTERESTED IN ARCHIVAL WORK? We’ve been working in our archives since the start of the new year and discovering all sorts of new aspects of town history, some of which will be in the upcoming winter newsletter. If you like detective work, you’ll appreciate time spent sorting through files and new donations. It’s very interesting work and you’ll learn a lot. Interested? Contact us at 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

 

WHAT’S NEW AT THE CHS BLOG

February Carmine Guica Young Historians Update 

Monday, January 23, 2023

CGYHU for February 2023



As part of the Carmine Guica Young Historians (CGYH) program, the Cavendish Historical Society (CHS) provides teachers, students, families and the community with information on town, state and national history for the month ahead. 

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

• If you have questions, want to arrange for a program or need more information, call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

• To learn more about the various programs that CHS offers for students and community, as well as opportunities close to Cavendish, go to the Resource Page

• The CHS Cares Closet, located next to the steps of the Museum is free, open 24/7, and offers a wide array of things to do, read etc. for both children and adults.

 

UPCOMING PROGRAMS/TRIPS: 

• Feb. 21 (Tuesday) Mardi Gras or Fat TuesdayIn years past, we’ve had Bob come play Cajun Music and talk about Mardi Gras traditions. However, we will be in Burlington that day for a benefit. If you are interested in something before that date, or Zoom first thing on Tuesday, we can arrange that. If you want beads, I can drop them off the Monday before. 

• March 17 (Friday) St. Patrick’s Day. Teachers that are interested in a program for their students, please let me know. 

• Trips: If you would like a history related spring trip, it’s best to start scheduling now. 

 

FEBRUARY: While the shortest month of the year,  it’s an interesting one as it honors African American History, Valentine’s Day as well as Presidents Washington and Lincoln. If you are interested in programming, please don’t hesitate to contact us at the numbers above. 

 


AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY MONTH: 
The history of African American/Black History Month traces back to 1915, when the “Father of Black History Month,” Dr. Carter G. Woodson, founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, which is now known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). February was chosen in recognition of the birthdays of two celebrated supporters of African American citizens, Abraham Lincoln – the 16th President of the United States, and Frederick Douglass – an orator, writer, and abolitionist.

 

Cavendish’s History:  Cavendish has a strong abolitionist history. The Rev. Skinner, who was responsible for the Cavendish Stone Universalist Church, was a leader as were many others in town. Below are links that maybe of interest to you and your students:

Peter Tumbo/Tumber: Revolutionary War Veteran, Abolitionist & Former Slave: Dying in 1832 at the age of 106 (we doubt the age), Peter Tumbo lived in Cavendish for almost 40 years. We believe the name Tumbo reflects where he came from in W. Africa versus what his actual name was. It’s a fascinating piece of our history, which we are still working on. 

• Safe at Last in Cavendish: Includes information on John Brown, Rev Skinner and the abolitionist movement in town. It’s a story based on an oral history, that ended up leading us to Peter Tumbo. 

• John Brown in Cavendish 

• A letter regarding John Brown’s stay in Proctorsville 

 

General Resources

African American History MonthIncludes resources from The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Teacher Resources 

National Museum of African American History & Culture  

National Museum of African American Music

• Explore Vermont’s African American history. 

• VT African American Heritage Trail 

 

Dates of significance in February that pertain to African American history: Frederick Douglas was born in Feb. 1818. The exact date of his birth is unknown. 

• Feb. 1, 1960: Lunch counter sit in by four African American students at a lunch counter inside a Woolworth’s store in Greensboro, NC. The scene was repeated over the next few days, with protests spreading to other southern states, resulting in the eventual arrest of over 1,600 persons for participating in sit-ins. The Moment When Four Students Sat Down to Take a Stand 

• Feb 3, 1870: The 15th Amendment to the Constitution is ratified guaranteeing the right of citizens to vote, regardless of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Unfortunately, these rights did not extend to women, who gained the right to vote in 1920 when the 20th Amendment was ratified. 


• Feb. 21, 1965: Former Black Muslim leader Malcolm X (1925-1965) was shot and killed while delivering a speech in a ballroom in New York City.

• Feb. 22, 1956: In Montgomery, Alabama, 80 participants in the three-month-old bus boycott voluntarily gave themselves up for arrest after an ultimatum from white city leaders. Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks were among those arrested. Later in 1956, the U.S. Supreme Court mandated desegregation of the buses. The Montgomery bus boycott and the women who made it possible.

• Feb. 23, 1868: African American educator and leader W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963) was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

 

HISTORICAL DATES FOR FEBRUARY

Feb. 2: Groundhog Day: Since a groundhog (or woodchuck or "whistle pig") hibernates for the winter, its coming out of the ground is a natural sign of spring. In Europe centuries ago, people watched for other hibernating animals, including badgers, bears, and hedgehogs, as signs of winter's end. Germans who immigrated to Pennsylvania in the mid-1800s began keeping an eye on the groundhog, hence Punxsutawney Phil and the annual prediction from Gobbler’s Knob. 

 

How often is Punxsutawney Phil accurate? According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which analyzed Phil's predictions from 2008 to 2018, he was right only 40% of the time.

 

There’s a grain of truth to this as winter days when you can see your shadow clearly are often especially cold because there are no clouds overhead to insulate the earth.

 

Early February is midway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. In England this date is often referred to as Candlemas Day. Traditionally this was the day candles were brought to church for a blessing. This was thought to ward off plague, illness and famine. 

 

If Candlemas Day be fair and bright

Winter will have another fight

If Candlemas Day brings cloud and rain,

Winter won’t come again.

 



 

Feb. 7, 1812: Charles Dickens was born. He examined social inequalities through his works including; A Christmas Carol; David Copperfield, Oliver Twist, and Nicholas Nickleby. 

 

Feb 12, 1809: Lincoln’s Birthday The Miller Center 

 

Feb 14: Valentine’s Day The History Behind St. Valentine 


 

Feb 15, 1820: Susan B. Anthony was born. A pioneer in women's rights, she worked tirelessly for woman's suffrage (right to vote) and in 1872 was arrested after voting (illegally) in the presidential election. She was commemorated in 1979 with the Susan B. Anthony dollar coin, thus became the first American woman to have her image on a U.S. coin. The National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House 

 

Feb. 22, 1732: Birth of George Washington Mount Vernon Museum and Education Center 

 

February 24, 1582 - Pope Gregory XIII corrected mistakes on the Julian calendar by dropping 10 days and directing that the day after October 4, 1582 would be October 15th. The Gregorian, or New Style calendar, was then adopted by Catholic countries, followed gradually by Protestant and other nations.

Saturday, December 31, 2022

CGYHU for January 2023


As part of the Carmine Guica Young Historians (CGYH) program, the Cavendish Historical Society (CHS) provides teachers, students, families and the community with information on town, state and national history for the month ahead. 

GENERAL INFORMATION

• If you have questions, want to arrange for a program or need more information, call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

• To learn more about the various programs that CHS offers for students and community, as well as opportunities close to Cavendish, go to the Resource Page. 

• The CHS Cares Closet, located next to the steps of the Museum is free, open 24/7, and offers a wide array of things to do, read etc. for both children and adults.

 

TRACKING THE SUN: We were fortunate to have our series of December workshops on the 21st this year. As part of the workshops, we discussed how many of the traditions that are attributed to Christmas and other holidays actually grew out of solstice customs. 

 

After Dec. 21, daylight hours start to increase, and the sun is higher up, which  ends  with the summer solstice in June. Solar intensity depends on the sun’s height. But since the ground and the air take a while to catch up we won’t reach our coldest average temperature until the third week of January. Our daily gains in sunlight will be minuscule at first, just a matter of seconds a day, but will steadily grow until daily daylight expands by three daily minutes per day in March. 

 

The amount of increasing sunlight is different depending on location. For example, in Alaska in March, they receive an extra 7 minutes of daylight per day, adding up to an extra hour of sunlight each week, while in our area it’s much slower. By the end of January we will be gaining sunlight by 2.23 minutes per day and reach our peak of sunlight per day at the time of the spring equinox March 20.  

 

It can be both and interesting for students to track the changes over the next month or so. Use this link for Cavendish Sunrise, Sunset and Daylength. 

 

TRIPS: Now is the time to be thinking about history related class trips for spring. Please let us know what you’d like to consider.

 

HISTORICAL DATES FOR JANUARY

January 1: Happy New Year! The most celebrated holiday around the world

• 1863: Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation which freed the slaves

 PBS Emancipation Proclamation Lesson Kids video 

 

Note : The Emancipation proclamation was not enforceable but as Union troops moved through the South, they brought the news of emancipation with them and the ability to enforce the order through military might. Further encouraged by the proclamation, large numbers of slaves freed themselves. 

 

On June 19, 1865, US Brigadier General Gordon Granger and his troops landed at Galveston, Texas confirming the news that the Civil War had ended and that enslaved African Americans were now free. Prior to Granger’s arrival, the US military presence in Texas was too weak to enforce President Lincoln’s 1863 Emancipation Proclamation. Two months after General Lee’s surrender in Virginia, Union forces were strong enough to act as a liberating force for enslaved African Americans throughout the state. This became known as Juneteenth, which is now a federal holiday. 

 

The 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery was ratified on Dec. 6, 1865. Unfortunately, slavery was not abolished until the summer of 1866, as the five tribes that were driven in the Trail of Tears, continued the practice of slavery. 

 

Other events on this date include: The establishment of the United Nations in 1942

 

January 6: Feast of the three Kings, which officially ends the 12 Days of Christmas

 

January 11: Alexander Hamilton is born in the British West Indies. While the film version of the Broadway play is available from Disney+, a special website has been set up for teachers and students-Teaching History with Hamilton 

 

January 15: Martin Luther King was born in 1929

• The King Center: The King Library and Archives in Atlanta is the largest repository of primary source materials on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the American Civil Rights Movement in the world. 

Smithsonian Resources for MLK 

PBS MLK Legacy 

• Teaching Tolerance 

 

January 17: Benjamin Franklin was born in 1706

Franklin Institute 

 

January 19: Edgar Allen Poe was born 1809. 

The Poe Museum Educational Resources 

Thursday, December 1, 2022

CHS Briefs December 2022


If you have questions, would like to volunteer with Cavendish Historical Society (CHS), or have items for the CHS Cares Closet please e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.comor call 802-226-7807.

 Welcome winter, though it officially doesn’t start for about 20 days. Thanks to Dave Gallagher and Ana, the lights at the Museum are shinning bright, and thank you to Svetlana Phillips for the Stone Church decorations.

 

NEW FOR WINTER 2023/Fireside history chats: In response to various people asking if we’d be repeating different talks/programs at times that were better suited for them, CHS is introducing “Fireside History Chats”this winter. You pick the topic, the time and the place. Invite up to 10 other people, and CHS will bring the program to you, provided it’s within the Okemo Valley. It can be at someone’s home or a central meeting place. 


 

While we can arrange for a particular topic, some talks you might be interested in include:

• Captive Johnson: The story behind “Calico Captive”

• Reading Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn: Pick a book, prose poems etc.

• “Columbian Exchange,” refers to the transfer of plants, animals, precious metals, commodities, culture, human populations, technology, disease and ideas between the Americas and Afro-Eurasia after 1492.

• Phineas Gage

• The eerie side of Cavendish

• The first peoples of Cavendish

 


HOLIDAY PROGRAM
In December, CHS runs a series of workshops for CTES students, featuring a different country and Winter Solstice traditions. This year we will be studying the Ukraine through its folktales, Father Frost and the legend of the spider. The date for the workshops is tentatively set for Dec. 21. If you have a home learner that would like to take part in the workshops, please contact the teacher for their respective grade. 

 

INTERESTED IN ARCHIVAL WORK? CHS is going to be relocating the archives in 2023. Before they are moved, a lot of work is needed in sorting and cataloguing. It’s very interesting work and you’ll learn a lot. If interested? Contact us at the numbers above.

 

WHAT’S NEW AT THE CHS BLOG

• CGYHU (Young Historian’s) Update for Dec. 2022 

• Fall Scribbler II 

 

CHS’S ANNUAL APPEAL

November 25, 2022

 

Dear Friend:

 

Chances are that you follow one of the many outreach efforts of the Cavendish Historical Society (CHS) and therefore know it’s been a busy year, with new programs, amazing young historians, and uncovering hidden aspects of Cavendish history. What we haven’t had a chance to post is that the Cavendish Stone Church belfry and roof were repaired in October. We can breathe a sigh of relief as winter rain, snow and wind are now upon us. 


One of my favorite parts of the summer, was the emergence of a group of Cavendish boys that call themselves, “Wild Boys,” because they are teaching themselves how to live off the land. In grades 2-5 at Cavendish Elementary, they’re part of CHS’s Young Historian’s program. In August, they asked if I’d open the Museum so they could see Phineas Gage’s skull. We ended up doing a special mid-week program for them. They became regular Sunday visitors, asking terrific questions and wanting to participate in other CHS programs.  It’s incredible to see a new generation of historians forming, and we hope to have new programs for them and other curious kids the summer of 2023. 

 

Even though the Museum is closed for the winter months, there is still a lot happening, not only with Young Historians, but with archival work. While we need all the donations we can get, please look at the ways below you can help with volunteer activities and let us know, using the numbers above, if you can help 

 

You can play an integral part in CHS by:

• Donating to the annual appeal campaign (see attached form), specifying how you want your contribution to be used. 

 

• Renewing your annual membership.

 

• Volunteering to help with our various programs. We are currently in need of volunteers to help with the archives; identifying WWII patches for the Brenda Gregory project; organizing archives; serving on the board and planning fundraisers.

 

• Donating gently used items to the CHS Closet (please call or e-mail, we’ll make arrangements to pick up items).

 

• Sharing family Covid journals and items that can be archived for future generations. 

 

Wishing you a joyous holiday season, and a safe and happy New Year.

 

Sincerely,

 

Margo Caulfield, Director

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, November 21, 2022

Carmine Guica Young Historians Update December 2022


 As part of the Carmine Guica Young Historians (CGYH) program, the Cavendish Historical Society (CHS) provides teachers, students, families and the community with information on town, state and national history for the month ahead. 

GENERAL INFORMATION

• If you have questions, want to arrange for a program or need more information, call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

• To learn more about the various programs that CHS offers for students and community, as well as opportunities close to Cavendish, go to the Resource Page

• The CHS Cares Closet, located next to the steps of the Museum is free, open 24/7, and offers a wide array of things to do, read etc. for both children and adults.

 

THERE’S ALWAYS TIME FOR CIVICS: Vermont’s cartoonists have created a new illustrated guide. “Freedom and Unity: A Graphic Guide to civics and Democracy in Vermont.”  It’s a collaborative project between the Vermont Secretary of State’s Office, the Center for Cartoon Studies, and the Vermont Humanities Council in an effort to make politics more understandable for everyone. Easy to read, it provides an overview of VT history, including 1st peoples, and it goes into detail for things like Town Meeting.  Download a copy or purchases copies by clicking here.You can purchase print  copies at the Norwich bookstore. 

 

HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS: In December, CHS runs a series of workshops for all of the grades at CTES featuring a different country and Winter Solstice traditions. 

Teachers: Please let me know if you want to do this on one day This year we will be studying the Ukraine through its folktales, Father Frost and the legend of the spider. Below are the activities planned for each class:

 

K-1 The Mitten is a common folktale for Ukrainian families to read during the holidays. Students will watch the video and decorate white mittens that can be used as ornaments. 


 

2-3rd: Sunflower ornaments The sunflower is the national flower of the Ukraine. It’s a symbol of peace and hope, and admired for how it turns to face the sun. The oil extracted from the plant is one of the most widely used oils in the world, being used for frying, roasting, margarine and salad dressings. 

 

4th: 8 pointed star ornament  The eight pointed star appears very frequently in Ukrainian art, as it represents the sun god Dazhboh, and foretells good fortune. 

 

5t: Spider and web ornament  


 

6h Pysanky. While the Pysanky egg is most frequently thought of as an Easter tradition, many Ukrainians now celebration the winter holidays with ornaments made with this technique. Students will be given an egg to decorate with Ukrainian patterns using paints and markers. This video shows how the eggs are decorated. 


 

HISTORICAL DATES FOR DECEMBER 

Dec. 1 1955: The birth of the modern American civil rights movement occurred when Rosa Parks was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, for refusing to give up her seat to a white man and move to the back section of a municipal bus. Interview with Rosa Parks 

 

Dec. 2, 1859: Abolitionist John Brown was executed for treason following his raid on the US Arsenal at Harper’s Ferry. 

 

Dec. 6, 1865: The 13th Amendment to the US Constitution was ratified abolishing slavery. 

-       St. Nicholas Day This has been a tradition in Holland for centuries. This video includes all the traditions as well discusses current concerns about certain aspects of the holiday. 


 

Dec. 7, 1941: The US Naval base at Pearl Harbor, HI was bombed, killing nearly 3,000 Americans. The US declared war on Japan the next day. Original Pearl Harbor News Footage 


 

Dec. 11, 1918: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was born in Russia. The 1970 Noble Prize winner in literature and the Templeton Prize winner in 1983, Solzhenitsyn lived in Cavendish for 18 of the 20 years he was exiled from Russia. While here he wrote the Red Wheel. CHS has a book for 4th-7th graders The Writer Who Changed History: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. If there is interest in having a group of students read the book and discuss it, we can arrange for a Zoom discussion. 

 

Dec. 13:Saint Lucia’s Day


-       1773: The Boston Tea Party 


 

Dec. 18-Dec. 26: Happy Hanukkah. Hanukkah is a Jewish festival commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire. Also known as the Festival of Lights. The Story of Hanukkah for Kids 


 

If you would like a dreidel for your student/class, please contact us as we have plenty. They come with directions. 

 

Dec. 21: Winter Solstice (the shortest day of the year) National Geographic video 


 

Dec. 25: Merry Christmas

-       Washington crossed the Delaware

 

December 26-January 1 - Kwanzaa, an African American family observance established in 1966 celebrating traditional African harvest festivals, focusing on family unity, with a community harvest feast on the seventh day. Kwanzaa means "first fruit" in Swahili. Learn more about Kwanzaa by watching What is Kwanzaa and How is it Celebrated 


 

Dec. 31st: New Year’s Eve


CHS's Annual Appeal Campaign

 

CAVENDISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

 

                   P.O. Box 472  Cavendish, VT 05142

margocaulfield@icloud.com             802-226-7807

 

www.cavendishhistoricalsocietynews.blogspot.com

www.facebook.com/PhineasGageCavendish

www.pinterest.com/cavendishvt/historical-cavendish/

www.thewriterwhochangedhistory.com

                                                                                    

 

 

November 25, 2022

 

Dear Friend:

 

Chances are that you follow one of the many outreach efforts of the Cavendish Historical Society (CHS) and therefore know it’s been a busy year, with new programs, amazing young historians, and uncovering hidden aspects of Cavendish history. What we haven’t had a chance to post is that the Cavendish Stone Church belfry and roof were repaired in October. We can breathe a sigh of relief as winter rain, snow and wind are now upon us. 


One of my favorite parts of the summer, was the emergence of a group of Cavendish boys that call themselves, “Wild Boys,” because they are teaching themselves how to live off the land. In grades 2-5 at Cavendish Elementary, they’re part of CHS’s Young Historian’s program. In August, they asked if I’d open the Museum so they could see Phineas Gage’s skull. We ended up doing a special mid-week program for them. They became regular Sunday visitors, asking terrific questions and wanting to participate in other CHS programs.  It’s incredible to see a new generation of historians forming, and we hope to have new programs for them and other curious kids the summer of 2023. 

 

Even though the Museum is closed for the winter months, there is still a lot happening, not only with Young Historians, but with archival work. While we need all the donations we can get, please look at the ways below you can help with volunteer activities and let us know, using the numbers above, if you can help 

 

You can play an integral part in CHS by:

• Donating to the annual appeal campaign (see attached form), specifying how you want your contribution to be used. 

 

• Renewing your annual membership.

 

• Volunteering to help with our various programs. We are currently in need of volunteers to help with the archives; identifying WWII patches for the Brenda Gregory project; organizing archives; serving on the board and planning fundraisers.

 

• Donating gently used items to the CHS Closet (please call or e-mail, we’ll make arrangements to pick up items).

 

• Sharing family Covid journals and items that can be archived for future generations. 

 

Wishing you a joyous holiday season, and a safe and happy New Year.

 

Sincerely,

 

Margo Caulfield, Director