Thursday, May 26, 2022

CGYHU for June 2022


Note:
 The next CGYHU post will be in late August. Have a wonderful summer. 

 

As part of the Carmine Guica Young Historians (CGYH) program, the Cavendish Historical Society (CHS) provides teachers, students, families and the community with information on town, state and national history for the month ahead.  

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

• If you have questions, want to arrange for a program or need more information, call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

• To learn more about the various programs that CHS offers for students and community, as well as opportunities close to Cavendish, go to the Resource Page

• The CHS Cares Closet, located next to the steps of the Museum is free, open 24/7, and offers a wide array of things to do, read etc. for both children and adults.

 


CHS PLANT SALE

The Annual CHS Plant sale is Friday, May 27, from 5-7 pm and Saturday May 29th from 9-noon. The sale takes place in front of the Cavendish Historical Society Museum. There are lovely hosta, container veggies and herbs, geraniums and a variety of perennials. The CHS Cares Closet will be open, where books, puzzles and whatever else is free. KN95 masks, adult and children sizes, plus hand sanitizer will be available for free. Moonlite Meadows will have their free range/grass fed beef for sale.

 

UPCOMING YOUNG HISTORIAN TRIPS/EVENTS: If you would like your home learner to participate in these programs, please contact the respective teachers for their grades.

• June 2 (Thursday): Shaker Village Enfield, NH (3rd grade)

• June 3 (Friday): Cleaning gravestones (6th grade)

• June 10 (Friday): St. Gaudens’ and Precision Valley Museum (4-6th grades)

• July 30 (Saturday): Annual Town Wide Tag Sale from 9-2. If a class wants to do a fundraiser, this is a good day to do it. Email or call numbers above for more information. 

 

UPCOMING CHS ACTIVITIES

May 27-28 (Friday-Saturday): CHS Annual Plant Sale; 5-7 pm Friday; 9-Noon Sat. 

May 29 (Sunday): Museum opens for the season 2-4 pm

June 18 (Saturday): Midsummer Night’s Eve Cavendish Village Ghost Walk. Meet at the Museum at 8 pm. Wear comfortable walking shoes and bring a flashlight. Lots of new stories this year. 

July 30 (Saturday): 11th Annual Town Wide Tag Sale, 9-2 CHS booth will be on the Proctorsville Green

August (Sunday): Cavendish Gorge Walk. Date to be determined.

September 11 (Sunday): Annual Phineas Gage Walk & Talk, begins 2 pm at the Museum. Wear comfortable walking shoes. 

October 9 (Sunday): The Columbian Exchange talk at the Museum, 2-4 pm. Until Columbus’ voyage, the Americas and Afro-Eurasia had little knowledge of each other’s existence. The widespread transfer of plants, animals, metals, commodities, cultures, disease, technology, colonization that ensued is still felt to this day. This is the last Sunday the Museum is open

December (Date to be announced): Christmas Ghost Walk Proctorsville

 

 

HISTORICAL SUMMER DATES

JUNETEETH June 19: Freedom Day, Jubilee Day, Liberation Day or Emancipation Day, Juneteenth is theoldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. On June 19, 1865, a Union General rode into Galveston, Texas to announce that the Civil War had ended, and slaves had been freed.

 

4TH OF JULY: To help students understand the American Revolution and the Declaration of Independence consider the following activities:

• Watch The American Revolutionary War for Kids 



• Read the Declaration of Independence with your child and discuss it. 


• Watch the TED-ED Video What you might not know about the Declaration of Independence 


Visit Patriot graves in Cavendish cemeteries-Old Revolutionary off of Brook Road, Coffeen and Center Rd have the most Revolutionary veterans' graves.


Learn about the founders of Cavendish Village, Salmon Dutton, and  Proctorsville (Captain Leonard Proctor) who were both veterans of the Revolutionary War. Proctor was a “minuteman” at the Lexington Alarm. He eventually served under George Washington. He is buried in the Proctor Cemetery. Learn more about him at the CHS Blog. 

 

Salmon Dutton served in the Westford militia with Proctor and fought in the French and Indian War. He is buried in the Cavendish Village Cemetery off of High St. Learn more about him at the CHS blog. 

 

 For easier identification look for slate markers as well as flags

Thursday, May 12, 2022

Scribble II: Spring 2022 edition

 

                                                      THE SCRIBBLER II

The Cavendish Historical Society Newsletter

www.cavendishhistoricalsocietynews.blogspot.com

www.facebook.com/PhineasGageCavendish

www.pinterest.com/cavendishvt/historical-cavendish/

www.thewriterwhochangedhistory.com

 

PO Box 472 Cavendish, VT 05142

 

802-226-7807     margocaulfield@icloud.com

Spring 2022  Vol. 16, Issue 2

 

 


UPCOMING EVENTS

 

May 27-28 (Friday-Saturday): CHS Annual Plant Sale; 5-7 pm Friday; 9-Noon Sat. We will have container veggie plants, including tomatoes (Cherry, Sungold and Early Girl) and lettuce buckets. If you are interested in one of these containers, please order ASAP using the above contact information. Moonlite Meadows Farm will also be on hand with their grass fed beef and other products.

May 29 (Sunday): Museum opens for the season 2-4 pm

June 18 (Saturday): Midsummer Night’s Eve Cavendish Village Ghost Walk. Meet at the Museum at 8 pm. Wear comfortable walking shoes and bring a flashlight. Lots of new stories this year.

July 30 (Saturday): 11th Annual Town Wide Tag Sale, 9-2 CHS booth will be on the Proctorsville Green

August (Sunday): Cavendish Gorge Walk (see article below). Date to be determined.

September 11 (Sunday): Annual Phineas Gage Walk & Talk, begins 2 pm at the Museum. Wear comfortable walking shoes.

October 9 (Sunday): Last Sunday the Museum is open

December (Date to be announced): Christmas Ghost Walk Proctorsville

 

The Museum is open on Sundays from 2-4 pm from Memorial Day weekend to Indigenous Peoples weekend. To visit the Museum at other times, please use the contact information above to arrange a date and time.

 

REMEMBERING SEYMOUR LEVEN

 


It is with sadness that we report the passing of Dr. Seymour Leven on Feb. 15 at 99 years of age. A WWII vet, he was a valued member of Cavendish as well as CHS.

 

In 2013, he, Carmine Guica and Jim Hasson spoke to the 6th grade at Cavendish Town Elementary School (CTES) about their war experiences. At that time there were six WWII vets living in Cavendish, and eight from Cavendish who lived elsewhere. Seymour was the last of the 2013 group. Jim Hasson died in 2021 and Carmine in 2016.

 

Originally from Grand Rapids, MI, Seymour had several reasons for enlisting: to keep up with his older brother; his dislike of school (he had already finished two years of college) and he had family in Lithuania who were forced into the concentration camps.

 

Initially in officer’s training school, he was moved into gunnery and bombardier training. Instead of going to Europe, as he had hoped, he was sent to the Pacific as a tail gunner on a B-29 bomber, serving with the 881st Bomb Squadron, 500th Bomb group. At one point, Seymour’s crew went stateside for additional training. While it was top secret at the time, it later became apparent that his flight crew was among those that would be the back-up for the Enola Gay, which dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.

 

Completing 23 aerial combat missions, Seymour’s division, located on Saipan was featured in the War Department’s film The Last Bomb-US Army Air Force, B 29 Raids on Japan, WWII 22050.

 

After the war, Seymour took advantage of the GI bill to complete college and graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School. He became a psychiatrist, eventually becoming the medical director of the Nassau County, NY Mental Health Department. Working with combat veterans, including those who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, one of his areas of interest was post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD). After retiring from a full time medical practice in 1978, he worked until he was close to 90 as a “locum tenens,” where he traveled around the country, filling in for other doctors.

 

Seymour had lots of interests including golf, cooking-more than once he noted that if he had it to do over again he’d be a chef-, boxing, story-telling and a great love of quantum physics. His granddaughter, Jade, summed it up best, which she posted after his death, Wherever you are now, Poppy, hopefully already spinning around at the speed of light as a neutrino, enjoying a Pina colada and a plate of oysters (as nonsensical as that might be), know that we love you and we miss you

 

Seymour was a CHS board member in part because he wanted to support his wife Gloria. However, he helped to shape the CHS attitude of “just get it done.” As he pointed out at a meeting, “I don’t have a lot of time, so let’s just do it and stop talking about it.” If you knew Seymour, you know his actual language was a tad more colorful.

 

In honor of Seymour, there will be a military salute at the Cavendish Village Cemetery on High St followed by a gathering at the Cavendish Baptist Church on Saturday, June 4th 2022 at 2:00pm. Please bring your stories and remembrances.

 

Our condolences to his wife Gloria, his two sons Andy (Mary), and Bobby, granddaughter Jade Lily Ormrod-Leven, great grandson Jasper and his sister Liz Wolfson.

 

CAVENDISH GORGE

 


In August, CHS will conduct a walk to the Cavendish Gorge. In preparation for the tour, we came across a survey report from July 1983 by J.C. Jenkins as part of The Water- Falls, Cascades and Gorges of VT: For the Agency of Natural resources Dept of Environmental Conservation and the Dept of Forests and Recreation. Below are excerpts from the report

 

The gorge is on a back road about three-quarters of a mile from the center of town. The nearest houses are about one- quarter mile away. The entrance road is not marked, and is comparatively rough; hence, the area is accessible but not obvious.

Both sides of the gorge are wooded with second-growth pine and hemlock stands. To the east is Hawks Mountain and to the west a small cobble which isolates it from Route 131 and the Town of Cavendish. At the head of the gorge is a concrete dam about 30 feet high and 75 feet long, with a steel catwalk to service the flashboards and two small buildings. The water is diverted into a buried penstock north of the gorge. At the bottom of ~he gorge is a medium-sized powerhouse probably built in the 19 20 s. Note: The Powerhouse was built in 1907 and is now owned and operated by Green Mountain Power.

The gorge turns a corner about 50 yards below the dam, and has high steep walls; hence the dam, powerhouse, and the penstock are not visible from the main part of the gorge and much of the gorge is undisturbed and private.

The Black River is a medium-sized river averaging 20-40 feet wide above the gorge. It receives treated waste in Ludlow and Proctorsville, and is classified as c water for two miles below Cavendish. Despite this the water in the gorge actually appears to be quite good, with no taste or odor and very little turbidity. There are good mayfly and stonefly populations within the gorge and we may assume that the water is well oxygenated.  Note: Black River Action Team (BRAT) tests the water quality of the swimming hole just below the Gorge weekly during the summer months. Unless there has been a recent rain, the water quality is good and suitable for recreation.

 

The gorge averages 50-lOO feet wide at the base, with slanting or sheer rock walls from 50-80 feet high. The rock is a hard quartzite schist with garnets and quartz veins, described by the geological map as the Cambrian Hoosic Schist. It is not at all limy. There are boulders ten to 20 feet high in the stream channel, and in the lower part of the gorge many of these have had potholes cut into them. Some are almost cut entirely away.

There are no major falls; rather, the channel consists of a series of small falls or chutes linking pools of various sizes. The largest and finest of these is about 70 feet by 40 feet with a depth of nine feet at low water. It is almost completely circled by high, moss-covered rock walls, and is the sort of private swimming and sunning place that everyone dreams about (although swimming is discouraged in Class c water due to the health threat).

 

Because of the lack of soil, all the vascular plants in the gorge are confined to ledge tops and cracks in the walls. The flora is simple, consisting only of a few common species, mostly ferns, grasses and tree seedlings. No rarities occur. No list of vascular plants was made. As a whole, they play a very casual part in the botany of the gorge.

 

Visually it is a striking place; the rocks and the mosses are beautiful, the water is clean, and there are high walls and handsome pools. You cannot hear cars from the gorge, and because it is narrow and winding you have a strong sense of privacy and isolation. A lovely and satisfying place in good condition.

Some people refer to the area as “Lover’s Leap”  with two different stories connected to it.

The first story comes from “Myths & Legends of Our Own Land,” Charles Montgomery Skinner published in 1896. At a turn in the ravine rises the sheer precipice of Lover’s Leap. It is a vertical descent of almost eighty feet, the water swirling at its foot in a black and angry maelstrom. It is a spot when lovers might easily step into eternity, were they so disposed, and the name fits delightfully into the wild and somber scene; but ask any good villager thereabout to relate the legend of the place and he will tell you this. Two young farmers went to the gorge to gather rocks for a foundation wall. A quarrel ensued and one the farmer’s lost his balance and fell into the Gorge. Expecting to see a mangled corpse, the other farmer peered over the edge and saw the other man climbing up the side of the precipice. “Are you hurt much?” the first farmer shouted. The victim slowly and painfully stood, then began to search his pockets. A look of grave concern crossed his face. “Waal, I ain’t hurt much, but I’ll be durned if I haven’t lost my jack-knife.”

The second story is of an Indian maiden and a young man who were in love. Fearing they would never be able to marry as they came from different cultures, they jumped from Lover’s Leap. We learned of this interpretation while compiling materials for a Cavendish Players production back in 2011.

100 UNIQUE THINGS ABOUT CAVENDISH: PART II

 

Part I in this series appears in the Winter 2022 Scribbler II, which is available at the CHS blog, address above. It covers the following topics from Bruce McEnaney’s October 14, 1991 talk entitled “100 Unique Things About Cavendish:” schoolhouses; Belknap’s; Cemeteries; the Durkin House (Coffeen homestead); Dairy farms/cows; sugaring; and marble quarry. Bruce’s talk comments appear in italics, with current status in plain text.

 


The View from Derby’s:
There are few places that still have a view that you can look off like that or where, what I call the uplands fields. Not unique to Cavendish, there are a lot of places in Vermont where you can look off on a hillside and look down to a valley below, but that is ours. The view from the S Reading road is very popular, and is often photographed in the fall.

 

High Brook Farm/Mad Wives Stable (Bates Mansion at Brook Farm):

I know is was built in the 1890s. Was it built by the Bates? That is something I really should check into some time. They’re doing a lot of work there. [They’re] shoring up that barn which is just a beautiful structure now and especially also in its day. They’re bringing it back. …It reminds me of the Morgan Horse Farm in Weybridge. You just expect high stepping horses to come out of there. And I’m sure they did in its time. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993, at the time of Bruce’s presentation, the house and grounds were being restored/renovated by George Davis. Farming began on this property in 1788, and it grew over the 19th century to become one of Cavendish's largest and most successful dairy farms. In 1881 it was purchased by James H. Bates, a cousin of the previous owner. Yes Bruce, the Bates built the Mansion, which was completed in 1894. Clinton Smith, an architect from Middlebury was involved in its design. The barn, Mansion and out buildings continue to be worked on by the current owners.

 


The Steps to No Where:
I think that it is an interesting part of the past when you consider that you, not too long ago, and many of you remember, I barely do. You could walk from downtown Cavendish, walk down to the train station and  go right up at the top of those stairs and you could go wherever you wanted to go. We call it progress now and you can’t even do that. The stairs at the underpass on Mill St. still lead to “no where,” the site of the old Cavendish Village Depot.

 

Pleasant St (formerly Polaski St): I love this street. I think what I like most about it, and maybe, at least this has been to me and I have no reason to doubt it, all of those houses up along there were built as a direct result of flood [1927 flood], when people who lived in the village lost their houses. They surveyed out a road, or marked out a road and sold off some lots up there so most of those houses were built in 1928 or 1929? Is that right?. Someone in the audience “Francis Couliard’s was built in 30, the one by the windmill is. They didn’t lose anything in the flood. He just bought the lot. The Gay Brothers owned the property at that time.” Okay, so they deeded off the lots and enabled the people that were wiped out in the flood to build. Interesting street and interesting circumstances leading to a string of houses. According to Barbara Kingsbury’s history of Cavendish, between the Red Cross and contributions, money was raised to help those who lost their homes but had no flood insurance. “The Red Cross saw to it that the two houses partially under minded by the flood were moved back to safer sites. They provided funds to build houses for Tony Prokulewicz and Lucy Sperry, an elderly widow, on what became Polaski Street and bought a house on the street to the cemetery for Harry Bemis.” According to Bruce, the Gays donated the land.  Why Polaski St.? The name Pulaski is used throughout the United States in memory of Gen. Casimir Pulaski, who was an American Revolutionary War foreign military volunteer. Since Tony Prokulewicz was a valued Gay Brothers’ employee, it is suspected the street name was chosen to honor  his Polish heritage.

 

 

PRESERVE & SERVE

 

The CHS Carmine Guica Young Historians (CGYH) program’s Preserve & Serve has students cleaning and greening up for spring/summer. The 6th graders have been helping one of our neighbors who can no longer do yard work. They’ll also be laying flags on all the veteran graves in the Cavendish cemeteries and will follow up with grave stone cleaning. Fourth and 5th grades are tackling the school park. It’s amazing how much you can get done with a group of hard working kids. Special thanks to our students, volunteers and to the Cavendish Community Fund, whose grants has help equip the students with ample gear.

 

The end of the school year is a busy time as not only do the Young Historians help to “preserve and serve,” but they also have an opportunity to take some field trips. This year the 4-6th grades are going to St. Gaudens and to the Precision Valley Museum. The third grade will participate in a program at the Enfield Shaker Museum. A special thank you to Ernestine van Schaik whose generous support helped to start the CGYH and makes these trips possible.

 

BECOME A MEMBER, RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP, DONATE

 

If you have not joined the Cavendish Historical Society, need to renew your membership, and/or would like to be a volunteer, please complete the form below and sending a check, payable to CHS, to CHS, PO Box 472, Cavendish, VT 05142. All contributions are tax deductible.

 

Name: _______________________________________

 

Address: _______________________________________________

 

 

Phone Number: _____________________          E-Mail: ____________________________

Membership Level

__ Individual Member $10       __ Senior Member 65+ $5       __ Sustaining Member $500

__ Household Member $15                ___ Contributing Member $250                               

 

Volunteer

___ I would be interested in serving, as a volunteer .I would be interested in serving on the following committee(s):__ Program Planning       __ Fundraising  __ Building (Museum)

__Archives                      _ Budget          ­­–– Cemetery    __ Carmine Guica Young Historians

 

Donations are always welcome and can be designated as follows:

__ For general purposes               __ Young Historians                  __Publications

__ Archaeological Activities                _ Museum & Archival             __ Special Events

__ Rankin Fund                            __  Williams Fund                    __ Solzhenitsyn Project

__ Other (please specify)              __ Cemetery Restoration           __ Preservation Projects

    

Monday, April 25, 2022

CGYHU for May 2022


As part of the Carmine Guica Young Historians (CGYH) program, the Cavendish Historical Society (CHS) provides teachers, students, families and the community with information on town, state and national history for the month ahead. This post is also available at the CHS blog.

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

• If you have questions, want to arrange for a program or need more information, call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

• To learn more about the various programs that CHS offers for students and community, as well as opportunities close to Cavendish, go to the Resource Page.

• The CHS Cares Closet, located next to the steps of the Museum is free, open 24/7, and offers a wide array of things to do, read etc. for both children and adults.

 


CHS PLANT SALE

The Annual CHS Plant sale is Friday, May 27, from 5-7 pm and Saturday May 29th from 9-noon. The sale takes place on the Museum grounds. If you are subdividing plants, bought to many (including vegetable/herb plants), or have bulbs you know you aren’t going to get around to planting, please contact us at the numbers above and we’ll take them off your hands. If you need pots and dirt, we can provide those as well.

 

HISTORY OF THE ABENAKI: The Great Falls and an Abenaki Relationship with Place  Rich Holschuh recently spoke about the significance of relationship with Place and it's now available on-line.  He focused on an Abenaki cultural worldview and its lasting implications while referencing a local site: Kchi Pontekw, the Great Falls in present-day Bellows Falls. Rich Holschuh is a resident of Wantastegok (Brattleboro, VT) and an independent historic and cultural researcher. He has served on the Vermont Commission on Native American Affairs and is a public Liaison and Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the Elnu Abenaki, members of the contemporary Indigenous community. Rich is founder of the Atowi Project. His work draws upon indigenous history, linguistics, geography, and culture to share beneficial ways of seeing and being in relationship with place.

 

If you are interested in the topic of petroglyphs, there will be a talk at the Rockingham Library on Wed. May 11 at 7 pm with Dr. Michael J. Fuller.

 

UPCOMING TRIPS/EVENTS: If you would like your home learner to participate in these programs, please contact the respective teachers for their grades.

• May 16 (Monday): Cemetery cleaning and laying flags on Veterans’ graves (6th grade)

• June 2 (Thursday): Shaker Village Enfield, NH (3rd grade)

• June 3 (Friday): Cleaning gravestones (6th grade)

• June 10 (Friday): St. Gaudens’ and Precision Valley Museum (4-6th grades)

• July 30 (Saturday): Annual Town Wide Tag Sale from 9-2. If a class wants to do a fundraiser, this is a good day to do it. Email or call numbers above for more information.

Preserve and Serve:  We’ve purchasing new supplies, thanks to a grant from the Cavendish Community Fund. The various spring cleaning projects start on April 29th with the 4th and 5th graders spring cleaning the school park.

 

Other trips being planned-Site visit to Tings’ farm (Farm to Table) 4th grade and archeological dig in middens (former farm dump site) of Tings’ farm (5th grade)

 

Arbor Day (April 29th): Vermont celebrates this date the first Friday in May. That will be May 6th this year.  Learn more about how VTcelebrates and how you can participate.

 

Memorial Day: A day to remember those who have died in service to their country. Called Decoration Day, it was celebrated and continues to be celebrated on May 31 in Cavendish. However, it was changed to the last Monday in May, and is often thought of as the first weekend of summer. Prior to Covid, CTES and the town have held a Memorial Day celebration, with speeches at the school, followed by a parade ending at Proctorsville or Cavendish High Street Cemetery. History of Memorial Day.

 

Make May Day Baskets: May 1 is known as May Day in many parts of the world. An ancient spring festival, in socialists countries it’s also known as a worker’s holiday or Labor Day. For many years in the Okemo Valley, May Day was celebrated by hanging small baskets of flowers on neighbors and friends doors. Print directions for a May Day Baskets and have the students cut out and assemble. Fill with daffodils or candies and leave on the doors of neighbors and friends.

 

Green Up Day: Celebrated throughout Vermont on May 7 (Saturday), you can pick up bags from the Town Office now and start Greening up. You can deposit trash, recyclables etc. at the Cavendish Transfer Station for free. Together we can keep Cavendish clean!

 

 

HISTORICAL DATES FOR MAY

May 5: Cinco de Mayo, which means 5th of May, has now become a time to celebrate Mexican heritage. It is a national holiday in remembrance of the Battle of Puebla in 1862, in which Mexican troops under General Ignacio Zaragoza, outnumbered three to one, defeated the invading French forces of Napoleon III.

 

May 7 1945: Known as VE Day (Victory in Europe) WWII in Europe ends

 

May 10: 1869 - The newly constructed tracks of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railways were first linked at Promontory Point, Utah. A golden spike was driven by Leland Stanford, president of the Central Pacific

 

May 14 1607 - The first permanent English settlement in America was established at Jamestown, Virginia, by a group of royally chartered Virginia Company settlers from Plymouth, England. Historic Jamestown

• 1804 - Meriwether Lewis and William Clark departed St. Louis on their expedition to explore the Northwest.

• 1796 - Smallpox vaccine was developed by Dr. Edward Jenner, a physician in rural England. He coined the term vaccination for the new procedure of injecting a milder form of the disease into healthy persons resulting in immunity. Within 18 months, 12,000 persons in England had been vaccinated and the number of smallpox deaths dropped by two-thirds. The origin of Vaccines

 

May 20 1927 - Charles Lindbergh, a 25-year-old aviator, took off at 7:52 a.m. from Roosevelt Field, Long Island, in the Spirit of St. Louis attempting to win a $25,000 prize for the first solo nonstop flight between New York City and Paris. Thirty-three hours later, after a 3,600 mile journey, he landed at Le Bourget, Paris, earning the nickname "Lucky Lindy" and becoming an instant worldwide hero. From New York to Paris 1927



• 1932 - Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic. She departed Newfoundland, Canada, at 7 p.m. and landed near Londonderry, Ireland, completing a 2,026-mile flight in about 13 hours. Five years later, along with her navigator Fred Noonan, she disappeared while trying to fly her twin-engine plane around the equator. National Air and Space Museum website for Earhart.

 

May 21, 1881 - The American Red Cross was founded by Clara Barton.

 

May 24, 1844 - Telegraph inventor Samuel Morse sent the first official telegraph message, "What hath God wrought?" from the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., to Baltimore.

 

May 25, 1787 - The Constitutional Convention began in Philadelphia with delegates from seven states forming a quorum.

 

May 25, 1994 - After 20 years in exile, Russian author Alexander Solzhenitsyn returned to his homeland from Cavendish, VT. He had been expelled from Soviet Russia in 1974 after his three-volume work exposing the Soviet prison camp system, The Gulag Archipelago, was published in the West. Solzhenitsyn Bids Farewell to Cavendish.


 

 Solzhenitsyn’s Return to Russia



Monday, April 4, 2022

CHS Briefs April 2022


If you have questions, would like to volunteer with CHS, or have items for the CHS Cares Closet please e-mail
margocaulfield@icloud.com or call 802-226-7807.

 

SPRING IS CREEPING IN Temps are all over the place but we can see the first blooms of the season in between snowflakes and muddy roads. This has been one of the worst mud seasons we’ve had in years. Definitely has us in a planting/planning mood though. Happy Spring!!

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

May 27-28 (Friday-Saturday): CHS Annual Plant Sale; 5-7 pm Friday; 9-Noon Sat

May 29 (Sunday): Museum opens for the season 2-4 pm

June 18 (Saturday): Midsummer Night’s Eve Cavendish Village Ghost Walk. Meet at the Museum at 8 pm. Wear comfortable walking shoes and bring a flashlight. Lots of new stories this year.

July 30 (Saturday): 11th Annual Town Wide Tag Sale, 9-2

September 11 (Sunday): Annual Phineas Gage Walk & Talk, begins 2 pm at the Museum. Wear comfortable walking shoes.

October 9 (Sunday): Last Sunday the Museum is open

December (Date to be announced): Christmas Ghost Walk Proctorsville

 


PLANT SALE:
Do you have any dahlia or gladiola bulbs you don’t want? We’d be happy to take them off your hands and pot them for the for the plant sale. Have other plants that need thinning? Please contact for plants/bulbs you’d like to rehome at the numbers above.

 

CARMINE GUICA YOUNG HISTORIANS: The students at Cavendish Town Elementary School (CTES) have been making sunflower seed packets to help raise funds for the Ukrainian Relief effort.


 

St. Patrick’s Day was in person and students in grades 3-6 had a chance to taste real Irish Soda bread plus learn a lot about the Irish and how they came to America.

 

We’re now preparing for end of year activities, including various Preserve and Serve projects in the parks, neighborhood and town cemeteries. Thanks to a grant from the Cavendish Community Fund (CCF), we’re well equipped with new rakes, gloves that actually fit, and other essential spring cleaning gear.

 

Activities being planned for the coming months include:

• May 16 (Monday): Cemetery cleaning and laying flags on Veterans’ graves (6th grade)

• June 3 (Friday): Cleaning gravestones (6th grade)

• June 10 (Friday): St. Gaudens’ and Precision Valley Museum (4-6th grades)

• July 30 (Saturday): Annual Town Wide Tag Sale from 9-2. If a class wants to do a fundraiser, this is a good day to do it. Email or call numbers above for more information.

• Shaker Village Enfield, NH 3rd grade. Date to be determined

 

NEW AT THE CHS BLOG

Carmine Guica Young Historians Upate (CGYHU) 

Scribble II: CHS Newsletter Winter Edition

 

Donations for CHS can be sent to CHS, PO Box 472, Cavendish, VT 05142. Checks should be payable to the Cavendish Historical Society.