Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Fall 2019 Newsletter


MIKE’S DOORS

Mike Pember
Museum Doors
It is with sadness that we report the passing of former Cavendish Historical Society (CHS) board member Mike Pember. Mike quietly went about getting things done, be it the painting of the fence around the War Memorial, or getting the right things we needed for the Grange Hall Curtain. However, he had two questions. “What are you gonna do with it?” was his favorite as we’d go through collections. The second and more frequent question was  “Where are those doors?” The doors to the Museum have been installed and painted and will be  remembered as “Mike’s doors.” Our condolences to his wife Sandra Russo, to his children and to his many friends and family.

NO, MR. HICKERNELL IS NOT BURIED IN THE BASEMENT


Hickernell House
We posted this story on the CHS website, linking it to several Facebook sites. There was an incredible response with people posting about the HIckernells, who lived in the Gothic revival stone house that can be seen from 131. Below is the story with the addition of various comments made.

This past winter, while talking with Phyllis Bont, we learned about what happened when Mr. Hickernell died. Supposedly he went missing around the same time Mrs. Hickernell had a cement floor poured in the basement. Not surprisingly, the rumor ensued that Mr. Hickernell was murdered and buried in the basement. Phyllis was quick to reply that Mr. Hickernell had died in the garage, as her husband Dr. Gene Bont, responded to the incident.

Theresa Hickernell, who claimed to have been from Austria and educated in private schools, had issues with Gene over the funding of public schools. Needless to say, it was a bit challenging for her to have him respond and ask what would have felt like extremely personal questions,, yet they were required in order for him to render the most appropriate care. “She just said all sorts of things to people about Gene after that,” Phyllis explained. “Fortunately, people knew what she was like.”

While CHS board member Bruce McEnaney, when learning of how Mr. Hickernell actually died, was disappointed to see “a perfectly good story wrecked,” he was surprised at what we were able to learn about Theresa Hickernell thanks to various leads Phyllis provided.

As it turned out, there is no evidence that Theresa Ruth Swetitch Hickernell-Smith was raised in Austria. She was born in St. Louis, Missouri on July 22, 1912 and died in St. Louis County, Minnesota Jul 22, 2003 at the age of 90.

To the stories she told of being part of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) in WWII, we found records that showed she was a trainee in the WFTD Class 43-4 being a “Washback from 43-2.” With no evidence that she graduated from the program, she was a regular contributor to the WASP Newsletter. In March 1980 she wrote the following:

"Yes, I was in the 1943 class of 43-2 at Houston Airport. From Houston, I flew to Goldsboro, NC, to be married to Francis Nelson Hickernell by a real Irish priest in a Catholic chapel. We had been married nine days when he was shipped overseas for four years. In the meantime, I had become associated with an accounting firm in Houston. I was later contacted by one of the generals in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, to do some auditing, flew to Whitehorse, stayed for two and really got to see the country in the rough. From there down to Seattle to some more flying - even soloed in a seaplane in Ketchikan, Alaska. Then headed for Baranoff Island, Alaska, for special work in accounting and found out how the commercial salmon industry works. Back in Seattle, I started mountain climbing in the Cascades. When the war was finally over, my husband and I met after all those years and decided upon a second honeymoon. We started out in December and ended in June, meanwhile looking for a place to settle and go into business. We decided on Richmond, VA, where we opened up a flower shop that was so successful that after we had had the shop only ten years we were able to close it regularly and do a great deal of traveling. I've been around the world nine times and have made thirteen trips to Europe. After having the shop for 20 years, we retired to Cavendish, VT.

I've climbed many of the high mountains, but the one I take special pride in is Mount Everest. In 1967 & 1968. I was a lone trekker with 8 porters, a cook, and head Sherpa. Although there was a ban on the peak, I was allowed to climb to 21,000 feet. I1 have 2800 feet of color film of this trek.

My husband and I both own a fire opal mine. We do gem hunting and go big-game sport fishing. Again this year I am trying to break the women's world record of 1170 pounds on giant blue fin tuna. Have landed many in the 900 class but I'm still trying for the big one.

These are only a small part of my adventures. I'd love to hear more about 43-2.

Mr. Hickernell's grave
Sgt Francis Nelson Hickernell died on April 8, 1982, approximately two years after his wife submitted her note to WASP Newsletter. He is buried in Lewistown Mifflin County, PA.

Theresa would marry twice more, divorcing her second husband. Her last spouse, Ralph Smith made the decision to move from Cavendish back to his hometown in Minnesota as Theresa had developed Alzheimer’s Disease and he needed assistance caring for her.

In the original post, Phyllis talked about how her son, Geno, deviled Mrs. Hickernell. As it turns out, Carole Bont was the organizer.  

Carol writes, I do remember hearing about Mr. Hickernell's death in his garage. I was also part of an earlier large group of teens who stood across the street from the back of her house while she threatened us with arrest. I believe some deputized adult came by and told us we could not go on her property. After the group of kids I was with left and went elsewhere, we came back by her house on our way home and I saw that someone had covered the top of her fence with shaving cream. She was her own worst enemy. If she had been remotely nice to any of us she would not have attracted our negative attention

Comments to post
• I grew up right next to her house, she used to threaten us kids and leave rat poison for our dogs. One time she told me and my dad she was going to skin our dog alive in front of us.

• We were scared of her when we walked by her house after getting off the bus. She usually yelled something at us.

• She never smiled at all.

• I took photos of this house which was clearly empty of occupants. After developing the film I noticed a white image of a person standing in the window looking out at me. He is still there. Protecting his precious gem collection perhaps.

• I lived next door for 6 years never saw her outside. When I was younger I was in the church youth group and we went to her home and she was very nice, she played a small instrument sort of like a harp but very small after that I wasn't afraid of her or that house.

• I helped build those stone walls... Working for Boy Towle and Melvin Buck... Mr. H was ok... Mrs. H definitely did not like kids... If you wanted to get in trouble, just walk on their lawn....

• Old lady Hickernell was a miserable old gal lol. I remember being a child and walking by her house when her husband had a heart attack shoveling....he wasn’t buried in the basement. Although I wouldn’t have put it past her lol

• If I remember correctly the day Theresa Hickernell died Cavendish experienced the "tornado" that caused all of the damage up through Cavendish Center. [July 2003]….Knowing Tess for many years, we always said that that microburst was Tess coming through Cavendish, one last time!!

• I grew up on the other side of her and learned that she was nice as long as you were respectful of her. She even invited my parents, Sonia and myself over for Almendetto wine one night, I was probably 13 at the time! Worse stuff ever!!! We were always cordial and she even liked my boys.

• When we were kids we would say “Hi, nice day.” to Mr. Hickernell. He would say “Nice day for a murder”. Didn’t think he was serious.

• I remember one time Christmas caroling (I think the youth group from Cavendish Baptist) and she actually invited us into the house for refreshments and gave us a small tour of part of the house. I think we were there a while and she was quite pleasant.

• I painted her house in the early 80's, such a warm, kind, loving and giving woman, just adored my children and insisted that she pay twice the quote I gave for her house. None of this is true, of course, except that I did paint her house.

• I was driving on High St by Frank Guica's house and she was out walking. She turned and saw my car and continued walking down the middle of the road and made me wait until she was ready to move to the side.




Making bracelets
CARMINE GUICA YOUNG HISTORIANS
The first months of the new school year are very busy, and this year is no exception. New this year is the  Preserve & Serve Program where students serve each other, their families, community, state and country. In so doing, they learn basic civics, how their community functions and what type of citizens we want them to become. The students in 5th & 6th graders have been doing fall chores for residents, while the 4th grade is maintaining the school gardens. Grades 2-6 made bracelets, which they sold and raised $317 to help Team Rubicon provide hurricane relief efforts in the Bahamas. The 6th grade participated in RiverSweep, helping to preserve the Black River.

At Coolidge
Trips so far have included: Calvin Coolidge Homestead; Tings Farm; Fitton Mill; Foliage Train; and Sturbridge Village. We have brought incredible speakers to the school, including the Chief of the Elnu, Roger Longtoe Sheehan, and experimental archaeologist Charlie Paquin.

For our holiday program this year, we will be celebrating “Winter Solstice.” The students will be making luminaries. If you have any Oui Yogurt glass jars, please drop them off at CTES or contact us at the address above to arrange for a pickup.


Center School
CAVENDISH SCHOOLS: Part III Center Rd School

Inspired by the paintings of John Snarksi, which were recently re hung in the Cavendish Town Elementary School (CTES), the spring edition of The Scribbler included the histories of The Cavendish Academy, Wheeler School; Fittonsville School; Duttonsville School; and the Rumke School. The summer edition of this newsletter included Tarbell Hill, featuring stories from Carmine Guica. This issue features stories from Sandra Stearns’ book “ Cavendish Hillside Farms 1939-1957/.

I attended the Center School, a rural one room school for eight years. We had no physical education, as such, but a walk of a mile each end of the day probably filled the need. Jannette, my sister, got married the same year I finished fifth grade. Thereafter I had to walk horses during the winter months before school each morning to clean the barn and feed the heifers there. After school there was wood to lug in, calves and horses to feed, cows to water and milking to be done.

We walked to school, rain or shine, balmy days and sub-zero. Often the roads were not plowed and we waded through snow up to our knees, sometimes almost to our waist. The larger, older ones (Jannette and later Donald Ackley) would go first and break the trail.

On below zero days we wasted no time on the trip and still arrived half frozen. Our fingers would be numb; our ears, nose, cheeks and chin tingling with the cold. When we arrived, if we were lucky, the wood stove in the corner would be burning briskly and our chills soon chased away. However, on the coldest days it took almost all day to reheat the room that had had no heat since the previous afternoon. Usually one of the Johnson children, who lived nearest to the school, was janitor. It was their job to lug wood in from the woodshed, build the fire in the morning and lug water by pail from Quinns. The janitor also had to sweep the floors each day after school and cleaned the chalkboards and erasers.

An oil heater was installed in 1947. Thereafter oil was lugged from the large storage tank in the woodshed and the fire kept going throughout the night, turned low. It went out over the weekend, but the janitor started it late Sunday afternoon in the winter time. ..

We did not have hot lunch. The Johnson children and usually Charlotte Quinn, living so close to the schoolhouse, went home for lunch. The rest of us carried a lunchbox and usually a thermos of milk. Those thermoses were glass lined and often times did not survive the trips to and from school.

I have never regretted the eight years I spent at the Center School. There were sometimes eight grades, usually only 6 or 7, with 15 or 20 students. The older students, when their work was finished, helped the younger ones practice phonics or listened to them read. They provided help with crafts and at playtime.

I was the only one in my grade for seven years so it was quite a challenge when I started high school. I had the best of both world. I did my own work and often did work with the grade above me. I also got to help the grades below me. I could work at my own pace and generally finished with each subject book ever year.

We studied reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic, history, geography, health and language. In the eighth grade we always had a semester of Vermont and local history. Our spare time was filled with craft projects and reading books.

BECOME A MEMBER, RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP, DONATE

If you have not joined the Cavendish Historical Society, need to renew your membership, and/or would like to be a volunteer, please complete the form below and sending a check, payable to CHS, to CHS, PO Box 472, Cavendish, VT 05142. All contributions are tax deductible.

Name: _______________________________________

Address: _______________________________________________


Phone Number: _____________________   E-Mail: ____________________________
Membership Level
__ Individual Member $10                       __ Senior Member 65+ $5            __ Sustaining Member $500
__ Household Member $15      ___ Contributing Member $250                                 

Volunteer
___ I would be interested in serving, as a volunteer .I would be interested in serving on the following committee(s):__ Program Planning           __ Fundraising       __ Building (Museum)
__Archives                    _ Budget        ­­–– Cemetery    __ Carmine Guica Young Historians

Donations are always welcome and can be designated as follows:
__ For general purposes                        __ Young Historians                  __Publications
__ Archaeological Activities                _ Museum & Archival             __ Special Events
__ Rankin Fund                          __  Williams Fund                 __ Solzhenitsyn Project
__ Other (please specify)                       __ Cemetery Restoration           __ Preservation Projects

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

CHS Briefs October 1, 2019



Please also check the Cavendish VT Facebook page for photo albums of various CHS activities.


UPCOMING EVENTS
Please note that the Museum will be closing for the season after the Oct. 13 program.

October 13 (Sunday): In May 2019, Vermont became the third state in the country to officially change the second Tuesday of October from Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day. Per the law, the establishment of this holiday “will aid in the cultural development of Vermont’s recognized tribes, while enabling all indigenous peoples in Vermont and elsewhere to move forward and formulate positive outcomes from the history of colonization.” On Oct. 13 (Sunday), at 2 pm at the Museum, the Cavendish Historical Society (CHS) will offer an Indigenous Peoples Day workshop. Presented in two parts, it will begin with a history of the first peoples in the Okemo Valley and will be followed by a “hands on activity” - make your own “Talking Stick.” Columbus Day has been a day or mourning for Native Americans. Indigenous Peoples Day offers an opportunity to begin a new conversation, one where the spirit of the Talking Stick guides us to listen as well as speak, so that healing and building together can take place.  This workshop is free and open to the public.

WHAT WE’VE BEEN DOING
Dave Gallagher
MUSEUM:  Dave Gallagher has been painting the steps, while Carl Liener has been painting the doors and entry way of the Museum. We can’t thank them enough for the time and care they’ve taken this summer. Please thank them if you see them.    

We have been making calls trying to find someone to repair the slate roofs of both the Museum and Stone Church. So far we’ve been unable to find someone. If you know of anyone that can help with this project, please call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

Coolidge Homestead
CARMINE GUICA YOUNG HISTORIANS: The first months of the new school year are very busy, and this year is no exception. In September we were involved in the following:
• The third graders are studying “then and now”  and visted the Calvin Coolidge Homestead; took a trip to the Tings Farm after reading Sandra Stearns book “Field Hill Farm;” and made their own “chalk boards” and learned about canning by making bread and butter pickles.
3rd grade at Ting's Farm
• The 5th grade spent Sept. 17 honoring Constitution Day at the Museum and on Sept. 30, experienced living history with Roger Longtoe Sheehan, who is the Sagamo (Chief) of the Elnu Abenaki Tribe and a talented Abenaki artist, Native musician and educator.
Chief Longtoe

The newest CGYH program, Preserve and Serve, is off to a great start
• The 6th grade once again participated in RiverSweep and  helping with fall lawn choirs for various community members.
• The 4th grade is maintaining the flower bed in front of the school

2nd &5th grades making bracelets
• Grades 2-6 made bracelets and several students helped sell them at the annual Honey Festival. As a result, they raised $317 for Team Rubicon, which is providing disaster relief in the Bahamas following Hurricane Dorian.

If you know of a community member who could use assistance with fall chores, please call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

Upcoming October Events include:
• Fitton Mill Tour 6th grade
• Foliage History Train Ride: 4th grade plus the students from Ludlow Elementary 4th & 5th grades
• Day long program with experimental archeologist Charlie Paquin 5th grade
• Visit to Sturbridge Village 6th grade
• Assisting community with fall chores: 4-6th grades

THANK YOU: CHS could not do all that it does without our incredible volunteers. Special thanks to:
• CHS board members Dan Churchill, Jenn Harper, Bruce McEnanney, and Kem Phillips who help in many different ways
• Doris Eddy: Volunteer for CGYH and helps with various lawn care projects of Preserve and Serve
• Dave Gallagher: Replacing, repair and painting of the Museum steps
• Carl Liener: Painting the doors and entry way of the Museum
• Cheryl Liener: Donated materials for the Team Rubicon project
• Bob Naess: The jack of all trades, and master of more than a few, museum doors, clean up and assistance with materials for the CGYH program
• Svetlana Phillips: She has a green thumb and then some. Her dedication to the plant sale makes that event possible, plus her designs for the CHS Museum planter are unique for each season.
• Dave Stern: Museum door
• Pang Ting: Dedicated volunteer who drives for the various CGYH trips, chaperones, provides the best soil for the plant sale and is so generous in sharing her farm with the school kids.
• Penny Trick: Driver and chaperone, she made the visit to the Coolidge Homestead very special this year as she is a docent there.
• Ernestine van Schaik whose donations have made the CGYH program what it is today.


HOW YOU CAN HELP: If you have questions or wish to volunteer with CHS, please call 802-226-7807, e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com



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Sunday, September 1, 2019

CHS Briefs September 1, 2019



Please also check the Cavendish VT Facebook page for photo albums of various CHS activities.

Indian Stones mark the birth of Captive Johnson in Cavendish.
RECENTLY POSTED TO THE CHS BLOG

UPCOMING EVENTS
September 8 (Sunday): Annual Phineas Gage Walk & Talk. The talk portion begins at 2 pm. We will be walking out to the site of the accident, which is approximately ¾ of a mile from the Museum. Comfortable shoes are recommended.

October 13 (Sunday): In honor of Indigenous Peoples Day, CHS will present a talk on the First Peoples of the Okemo Valley, 2 pm. Location is still pending. This is the last day the Museum will be open for the season.

WHAT WE’VE BEEN DOING
Dave and Bruce working on the steps.
MUSEUM:  Thank you so much to Dave Gallagher who did an incredible job in the renovation and restoration of the Museum steps and to Bruce McEnanney who assisted with the project. The doors are almost finished. Both the doors and steps should be painted later this month.   

We have been making calls trying to find someone to repair the slate roofs of both the Museum and Stone Church. So far we’ve been unable to find someone. If you know of anyone that can help with this project, please call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

CARMINE GUICA YOUNG HISTORIANS: The school year has started off with a bang. September projects will include:
Coolidge Homestead
• The third graders are studying “then and now”  will be visiting the Calvin Coolidge Homestead; taking a trip to the Tings Farm after reading Sandra Stearns book “Field Hill Farm;” and will make their own “chalk boards” and learn about canning by making bread and butter pickles.
• The 4th grade will be maintaining the flower bed in front of the school as part of a new CHS program.
• The 5th grade will spend Sept. 17 honoring Constitution Day at the Museum
• The 6th grade is participating in RiverSweep and helping with fall lawn choirs for various community members.

As part of “Preserving and Serving,” CTES students are helping to take care of important town landmarks as well as assisting community members who need help. If you know of a community member who could use assistance with fall chores, please call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

It was a short but sweet season this year, but thanks to the generosity of Betty and Bruce McEnanney’s blueberry picking fundraiser, the 6th graders will be going to Sturbridge Village on Oct. 30. This is a wonderful opportunity for students and every year we learn something new. Some of the canning techniques we learned last year we will be teaching the 3rd graders this month. Thank you Betty and Bruce!!

ARCHAEOLOGY: Since September is Archaeology month, several people asked if there would be an open house at the SCHEP project that CHS is involved with in West Haven, VT. Currently no event has been scheduled but if that changes we will send out a notice. Starting in late September, we anticipate volunteers will once again be working in the lab with this project at Castletown University.

HOW YOU CAN HELP: If you have questions or wish to volunteer with CHS, please call 802-226-7807, e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com










Friday, August 30, 2019

Indian Stones Timeline


INDIAN STONES TIMELINE

June 15, 1747: Susannah Willard marries Capt., James Johnson in Lunenburg, Ma.

1750: Moved from Lunenburg to Fort No. 4 in Charlestown, NH

August 29, 1754: The Johnsons host a party with neighbors, celebrating with watermelon and flip, at their homestead close to Fort #4.

Aug. 30 1754: Captain, Susannah, their children (Sylvanus-6; Susanna-4; Polly-2 and Susannah’s sister Miriam Willard (14 years of age) captured, along with their neighbor Peter Laberee  and hired hand Ebenezer Farnsworth.

Aug. 31, 1754: Susannah gives birth to daughter-Elizabeth Captive-1/2 a mile up the Knapp Pond Rd. making her the first recorded child of European descent born in Cavendish. The Indian Stones, which were erected by Susannah 43 years after the birth of her daughter, are in Reading.

Sept.7, 1754. They reach East Bay in Lake Champlain. Loaded into canoes and taken to the French Fort Crown Point (NY). They were well treated and remained for four days. They then traveled by water to St. Francis (Saint Francois du Lac) near Montreal. Everyone but Susannah, Sylvanus and Captive are taken to Montreal to be sold. In November, Susanna and Captive join them but the Abenaki keep Sylvanus.

Nov. 12, 1754: Once in Montreal, Capt. Johnson is given two months to secure a ransom for his family by the Governor. Accompanied by two Indians, he heads to Albany to secure ransom. Ultimately he is directed to Boston and then meets with Gov. Wentworth in Portsmouth, NH. He secures 150 pounds for ransom plus 10 pounds to defray expenses.

Feb. 15, 1755: Capt. Johnson is making his way back to Canada to pay the ransom. Receives a letter from Gov. Shirley (Mass) and is told not to return to Canada but come to Boston instead.

While Capt. Johnson is gone, Susannah, Miriam, and Captive reside with the DuQuesne family who treat them well. Polly (2) is now owned by the Mayor and his wife and Sue (4)  was bought by three elderly women. When Capt. Johnson doesn’t return in the prescribed timeframe, circumstances become more difficult and they leave the DuQuesnes, renting a room and supporting themselves by sewing.

June 1755: Capt. Johnson returns to Montreal but the governor has changed and is not sympathetic to their situation. They are reduced to paupers.

July 1755: Capt.Johnson is jailed in Montreal. On July 22, the family (Susannah, James and their two youngest children) is sent to Quebec and jailed. By this time Miriam’s ransom has been paid. She goes to the family of the Lt., General, where she continues to sew. Also having paid full ransom were Laberee & Farnsworth. However, they were not allowed to leave

Early spring 1756:  Laberee   makes his escape from the French, traveling at night and arrives in Charlestown in the winter. Farnsworth made it back to Charlestown before the other captives.

December, 1756: Susannah gives birth to a boy in prison that dies

July 20, 1757: Susannah, Miriam, Polly, and Elizabeth were sent to England via ship. James was not granted permission to leave and continued to fulfill his remaining prison sentence. They sailed to England and then to Ireland and arrive at Sandy Hook, NY in Dec.

January 1, 1758: Susannah is reunited with her husband. Because of legal troubles for violating parole, he travels back to New York to “adjust his Canada accounts.” There he was persuaded to take a Captain’s position in the French and Indian War. Move to Lancaster, MA.

July 8,1758: Capt Johnson dies in 1758 as an officer of the Crown at Ticonderoga-the Battle of Carillon.

October 1758: Sylvanus is returned to his mother at age 11 after his ransom was paid by the British. He was fluent in Abenaki and conversational in French, and fully accustomed to Abenaki life.

1759: Susannah moves from Lancaster, Mass to Charlestown, NH to her husband’s land. She opens a small store to support her family.

1760: The eldest daughter Susannah (Sue) is reunited with her family after the French surrendered Montreal. She only speaks French

1762: Susannah marries John Hastings Jr. She has seven children with him, of which only two survive. Ultimately she had 38 grandchildren and 28 great grandchildren.

March 20, 1769: Miriam Willard dies in Shirley, Mass, having been married to the Rev. Phinehas Whitney. They had no children.

1780: Captive Johnson marries George Kimball, of Cavendish. She is his second wife and has four children with him. He does not appear in the census after 1790 and it is possible that Captive moved with her daughter Betsy to Montreal.

1784: Polly marries Major General Timothy  Bedel. They have two children. Polly dies in NH in 1789 at the age of 36.

1794: Farnsworth dies in Charlestown, NH

1796: “A Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Johnson: An Account of Her Suffering During Her Four Years with the Indians and the French” is published.

1799: Susannah hires a stonecutter to create two slate markers, with the intent that one was to be placed at the birthplace, and the other at the nearby Native encampment site. The two stones were placed side-by-side in a location not far from their present site. Descendants of Johnson in 1918 had the two stones mounted in the granite slab.

1803: Laberee dies in Charlestown, NH at the age of 79.

1804: John Hastings dies

Nov. 27, 1810: Susannah dies in Langdon, NH, buried In Forest Hill Cemetery, Charlestown, NH

1824: Susannah Johnson Wetherbee dies in Concord, VT at the age of 73-74. She has 15 children, including five sets of twins.

1827: Captive Johnson Kimball dies in Montreal. She is buried under the Place d’Armes Orange Line Station on Montreal Metro

1832: Sylvanus dies in Walpole NH at the age of 84. He had married Susanna Hastings and had six children, none of whom married. He owned most of the land now known as North Walpole.

1957: Elizabeth George Speare’s publishes “Calico Captive”


                          Prepared by the Cavendish Historical Society for 8/25/19 presentation.

802-226-7807   www.cavendishhistoricalsocietynews.blogspot.com   margocaulfield@icloud.com

CHS, PO Box 472, Cavendish, VT 05142