Monday, January 4, 2021

CHS Briefs January 1, 2021

 

Happy New Year!

 


UPCOMING EVENTS

January: Pandemics/Epidemics: We are working with Okemo Valley TV to arrange for a Zoom workshop. Date will be posted shortly and will most likely be the week of January 25th.

 

May 29 (Saturday): Annual Plant Sale from 8:30-Noon. Early bird sale on Friday May 28 from 6-7 pm.

 

May 30 (Sunday): Museum opens for the season-Covid dependent-on Sundays from 2-4

 

June 19 (Saturday): Midsummer Night’s Eve Cavendish Village Ghost Walk. Meet at the Museum at 8 pm.

 

July 31 (Saturday): 11th Annual Cavendish Town Wide Tag Sale. 9-2.

 

September 12 (Sunday): Annual Phineas Gage Walk & Talk, meet at the CHS Museum at 2 pm. Walk portion if about a mile and a half and includes a visit to the site of the accident.

 

 

CAVENDISH MYSTERY: January can be a rather chilling month so what better time to explore, and possibly solve, some Cavendish history mysteries.

 

Anyone in the community that is interesting in doing some history sleuthing, can participate in the following ways:

 

Solve a town mystery: Cavendish has aspects of town history that we want to get to the bottom of. Several projects include:

• Is it legend or fact that the “potter’s field” in Hilcrest Cemetery was dug up during the 1930s (Depression era) and turned into a potato field?

• Who was murdered on the grounds that are now occupied by the Proctorsville Fire Dept? When did it occur?

Design an “Escape Room” for Cavendish. If you are not familiar, here’s a brief description, On the day the Peters Township Public Library in McMurray, Pennsylvania, was supposed to unveil a superhero-themed escape room, the library had to close its doors due to the coronavirus pandemic. With no physical location to work with, librarian Sydney Krawiec started to devise an alternative: a digital escape room created in Google Forms. In the space of four hours, she made a Harry Potter-themed game that sent participants through a series of challenges based on locations from the book series, and they had to find their way out by solving puzzles. The Google Form went viral. And after other librarians saw it, they decided to make their own. This is a fun activity for the whole family and there are now lots of them for free to do on-line.

Do you have a town history mystery you’d like to see solved? If so, please e-mail or call and we’ll help you work on it.

 


NEW AT THE CHS BLOG

Christmas Eve Ghost Story: Featuring some of Cavendish’s favorite spirits and their haunts.

Carmine Guica Young Historians Update: Includes information for remote learners, teachers, parents etc. Contains a lot of historical information and resources for the month ahead.

Directions for Origami Cranes

Solzhenitsyn’s Birthday-Release ofBook 2 of Between Two Millstones 

 

CARMINE GUICA YOUNG HISTORIANS PROGRAM

This month we begin planning for a mock town meeting. Students will discuss and decide what items will be included in the “warning.” In February, a “warning,” will be distributed to the students along with the date and time of  “town meeting. In March, we will be holding a mock town meeting for the students, which like most of VT, will be conducted by Zoom. 

 


CHS CARES CLOSET
: If you or someone you know would like to receive items from the closet, but can’t get there, e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com or call 802-226-7807 with your requests for books, puzzles, craft projects, hands on history kits, masks etc. All items will be placed on the porch, mail box or a designated spot. If you have items you’d like to donate to the Closet, please call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

 

Special thanks to our incredible volunteers Svetlana, Kem, and Ana who decorated the Museum, Stone Church, War Memorial and Closet for the Holidays. 

 

COVID-19: CHS continues to collects items, stories etc. associated with the pandemic for archival purposes. If you have something you would like to donate, please contact us.

 

 

Donations for CHS can be sent to CHS, PO Box 472, Cavendish, VT 05142. Checks should be payable to the Cavendish Historical Society.

Saturday, December 26, 2020

CGYHU for January 2021

For more information or assistance, please e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com or call 802-226-7807.

 

January can feel like such a letdown after all the activities of the holidays, so this January, CHS is introducing something new:

 


THE CAVENDISH MYSTERY

Students, teachers, parents or anyone in the community that is interesting in doing some history sleuthing, can participate in the following ways:

 

1. Solve a town mystery: Cavendish has aspects of town history that we want to get to the bottom of. Several projects include:

a.    Is it legend or fact that the “potter’s field” in Hilcrest Cemetery was dug up during the 1930s (Depression era) and turned into a potato field?

b.    Who was murdered on the grounds that are now occupied by the Proctorsville Fire Dept? When did it occur?

2. Design an “Escape Room” for Cavendish. If you are not familiar, here’s a brief description, On the day the Peters Township Public Library in McMurray, Pennsylvania, was supposed to unveil a superhero-themed escape room, the library had to close its doors due to the coronavirus pandemic. With no physical location to work with, librarian Sydney Krawiec started to devise an alternative: a digital escape room created in Google Forms. In the space of four hours, she made a Harry Potter-themed game that sent participants through a series of challenges based on locations from the book series, and they had to find their way out by solving puzzles. The Google Form went viral. And after other librarians saw it, they decided to make their own. This is a fun activity for the whole family and there are now lots of them for free to do on-line.

3. Do you have a town history mystery you’d like to see solved? If so, please e-mail or call and we’ll help you work on it.

 


TOWN MEETING

While Town Meeting Day in Vermont isn’t until March 2, activities begin in January to prepare for this event. Towns will be putting together a budget for both school and town, along with any items that will be voted on that day. This includes election of Select board members, town offices etc.

 

To help students learn more about this process, we will be holding a zoom town meeting in March, similar to what towns across VT will be doing this year. Thirty days prior to the Zoom mock town meeting in March, students will receive the “warning” so they can discuss and “research” to help them decide on the issues. January is when we come up with items to include in the “warning.”

 

HISTORICAL DATES FOR JANUARY

January 1: Happy New Year! The most celebrated holiday around the world

• 1863: Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation which freed the slaves

 PBS

Emancipation Proclamation Lesson Kids video

 

Note the following: The Emancipation proclamation was not enforceable but as Union troops moved through the South, they brought the news of emancipation with them and the ability to enforce the order through military might. Further encouraged by the proclamation, large numbers of slaves freed themselves.

 

On June 19, 1865, US Brigadier General Gordon Granger and his troops landed at Galveston, Texas confirming the news that the Civil War had ended and that enslaved African Americans were now free. Prior to Granger’s arrival, the US military presence in Texas was too weak to enforce President Lincoln’s 1863 Emancipation Proclamation. Two months after General Lee’s surrender in Virginia, Union forces were strong enough to act as a liberating force for enslaved African Americans throughout the state. This became known as Juneteenth.

 

The 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery was ratified on Dec. 6, 1865.

 

Slavery was not abolished until the summer of 1866. As the five tribes that were driven in the Trail of Tears, continued the practice of slavery.

 

Other events on this date include: The establishment of the United Nations in 1942

 

January 6: Feast of the three Kings, which officially ends the 12 Days of Christmas

 

January 11: Alexander Hamilton is born in the British West Indies. While the film version of the Broadway play Hamilton is available from Disney+, a special website has been set up for teachers and students-Teaching History with Hamilton

 


January 15: Martin Luther King was born in 1929

The King Center: The King Library and Archives in Atlanta is the largest repository of primary source materials on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the American Civil Rights Movement in the world.

Smithsonian Resources for MLK

PBS MLK Legacy

• Teaching Tolerance

 

January 17: Benjamin Franklin was born in 1706

Franklin Institute

 

January 19: Edgar Allen Poe was born 1809.

The Poe Museum Educational Resources

 


January 20: Inauguration Day:
Teaching Tolerance  has a webpage on how to discuss this presidential inauguration in view of such a controversial presidency and transition.

White House Presidential Inaugurations

Wednesday, December 16, 2020

A Cavendish Christmas Ghost Story: 2020


CHS’s Christmas Ghost Walk in Proctorsville had to be cancelled due to the resurgence of Covid-19. In its place we offer a special Cavendish Christmas Eve Ghost Story.

 

Following the story is information about Cavendish haunts as well as the tradition of Christmas Eve ghost tales  

 


On Christmas Eve many years ago, the town of Cavendish ghosts were planning their annual Christmas Eve gala and once again decided to congregate at what today is called the Golden Stage Inn. The spirits referred to it by many different names-Jack’s place or Jenny’s parlor-reflecting who they were on good terms with that was currently haunting the place. Others just called it “the Stage,” since it was the scene of so many “try outs” of new ways to scare the living.

 

It was to be a “locals only” event, but rumors had it that some “haints,” restless spirits from the south, had recently been seen floating about. Ghosts, like humans, find there is “no place like home” for the holidays, so it was a bit odd to see these spirits so far afield. However, as is in life, there are just those who like to mix it up and do things differently.

 

Cavendish has a number of children spirits, who, despite our thinking they might be lonely, are far from it. They are actually very happy, particularly on Christmas Eve because it means the living children will be receiving presents, and if there is one thing ghost children like its new toys.

 

Toys have evolved considerably over the decades, to say nothing of the centuries, but a child’s


imagination, be it human or spirit, continues to be dazzled by things that buzz, hum, whir, are brightly colored and do magical things. There is one 18th century boy, Tom, who is obsessed with anything that is electronic and he’s caused no end of mayhem trying to figure out how things work. You don’t want him anywhere near your computer as it will take hours and hours to repair after he’s been poking around. [Note: As I was writing this section, my computer suddenly went wonky. Hmmmm….]

 

If you find yourself blaming your child for a toy broken after one use, don’t be too harsh, particularly if little Janey blames her playmate, who only she can see.

 

A young spirit, Lily, was organizing the children for the evening frolic. Gathered at the Opera House on Depot St., one of their favorite haunts, they were trying to figure out  what could they do to scare the adult ghosts.

 

“I’ve been practicing my groans,” said Tom.

“How electrifying! Like that’s going to scare a ghost the likes of Jonathan Wheelock,” said Emily.

Isaac contorted his ashen face and cackled.

Right,” said Tom, as he produced one of his better moans and groans, much to the delight of the youngest ghosts.

 

All the old standbys were discussed and each one was rejected as not being scary enough, or “we’ve done that one too many times.”

 

They were mulling things over when one of the youngest spirits pipped up. Sarah had recently visited a friend of a friend’s relative who was at The Stage the previous week and had overheard the owners discussing some changes they wanted to make for Christmas. Seems they were in the process of painting, re decorating and in general, making preparations for a major Christmas Eve party.

 

Well that information threw a new light on the situation and they immediately began  shouting out ideas. There was such a kerfuffle that any hope of constructing a cohesive plan quickly evaporated into thin area.

 

By now darkness had settled on the town, with Proctorsville village looking particularly dark. The wind had picked up and snow was swirling around the porch of The Stage.

 


As the humans were being greeted at the front door, one noted how odd the snow and wind seemed to be acting. Little did they realize it was the spirits swishing by, entering through doors, windows and several of the kids slid down the chimney.

 

While the owners of the Inn greeted friends and families with words of good cheer, and circulating hot mulled cider, hot toddies, eggnog and other drinks of the season, the spirits were welcomed by “The Traveler.”

 

A very handsome man, wearing a long leather coat and boots, he was happily inviting the spirits to join in the fun and merriment of the season. Some sat on chairs, while others preferred to float about on the ceiling.

 

Each wore at least one item of apparel that gave a clue from when they were living beings. This was an important item for one of the night’s favorite games “3 Guesses- When and How I died.”

 

Ghosts love games, and the night ahead had plenty of them in store, but this one was a tad tricky as many ghosts had been around for eons. While some had moved on to other haunts, others stuck around just to see how things were working out. A bit of morbid curiosity you might say.

 

The Abenaki ghosts were very good at this game, particularly Screech Owl Woman, after all they’d been here for 11,000 years or so. To level the playing field, the rules were revised so you could assume other personalities. Sometimes they drew lots to help them with a different persona.

 

Not all the specter were good at this, particularly those that had drowned, were hung or had come to some unsavory end. It was just too easy to tell how they died, so instead they were in charge of organizing the game and keeping an eye on the children who could be so easily bored and create all sorts of mischief.

 

Another favorite game was “Whose Next,” where they placed bets on who among the living in town would be among them the following Christmas Eve. In fact that was always the first order of business, determining who’d won the previous year’s contest.

 

It wasn’t enough to say who you thought would die, you also had to give an approximate date as well as cause. For the new spirits, this was often the first introduction to many of their new “neighbors” and a bit odd knowing their demise was part of a contest.

 

However, they’d quickly get into the swing of things and, more often than not, they’d be the winners of the following year’s contest, since they knew who was in a sickly way before their own departure.

 


As the fire roared and the humans gathered closer, the spirits would drift in to see if any of them would figure in the ghosts stories being told. If one of them was mentioned by name, it was up to that ghost to do something to the humans to make their presence known. This could be anything, from rubbing up against them to making a loud noise, causing the fire to flicker in very eerie ways, douse the lights, spill a drink and so on. It was the highlight of the evening watching the humans squeal scream and even one child admitted to having peed themselves, “just a little,” they were so frightened. Oh, that was a hallmark Christmas Eve and from then on there would be shouts of “let’s see how many we can get to wet themselves this year.”

 

This particular Christmas Eve things were out of sorts. The merriment was a bit off.  There was something odd. Yes, the place looked different with new paint and furnishings. That must be it, but wait…the divan started floating in the air and bumping into the spirits hanging out on the ceiling. “Whose doing that?” shouted one of the older ghosts. A chorus of “not me” was cut short by the new painting suddenly coming to life.

 

The ghosts were feeling a bit uneasy. After all, they were use to being the haunters but were not so fond of being at the other end of the tricks. Who was doing this?

 

Books were starting to fly around the room and seem to be chasing all the women. It was utter chaos, with the ghosts no longer keeping to themselves but now were flitting all over the house.

 

Even the humans knew something was amiss.

 

This wasn’t one person complaining of a chill, rather it felt like a gale force wind had just swept threw upending tables and making those closest to the fire feel as if they were being tickled by icicles. Very quickly, the humans made their departure, with the owners completely perplexed by their dissolving Christmas festivities.

 

Just as when they arrived, the guests were met with swirling and whirling snow as the spirits themselves couldn’t wait to get out of there.

 

No sooner had both humans and spirits departed but out from the divan sprang Tom, who was followed shortly thereafter by a number of the other children. They just laughed and laughed and laughed.

 

They were quickly joined by an adult ghost named Mr. John. He had come to the Golden Stage when it was part of  an abolitionist movement that helped former slaves go to Canada or find work in Vermont, where slavery was illegal. Though Mr. John hadn’t died in Cavendish, he had loved the time he spent at the Golden Stage and so liked to return for the annual Christmas Eve ghost fete.

 

Coming from the south, he knew that the “haints” had some pretty devilish tricks up their shrouds. Overhearing Sarah talking about the renovations at The Stage gave him the idea of “haunted furniture.” One of the haints traveling about was only too happy to assist him and the children. Who doesn’t like to give a good scare, particularly if it includes some of those pompous Cavendish ghosts? This was to be a “haunt” that would be talked about for centuries to come.

 

While the children and Mr. John had such fun playing with the toys of the children who lived at The Stage, it wasn’t long before they heard the cock’s crow and knew it was time for them to be on their way. Even though they were sad to end such a lovely evening, they were also excited to see what new treasures would be revealed in just a few short hours from underneath the Christmas trees.

 

 

Ghosts of Cavendish: Over the years, CHS has learned of many different ghosts, haunted houses and all things that go bump in the night. Some places, like the Golden Stage Inn and the Wheelock House in Cavendish, are legendary as being haunted. The Dutton House was believed by locals to be haunted long before it was moved to Shelburne Museum, where the ghosts seemed to continue to tease the museum, staff and visitors alike.

 

Lena, one of our lady ghosts, is actually written into the deed of the house where she has “rights” to the front parlor and bedroom.

 

Interestingly, CHS receives inquiries from people regarding who or what is haunting their place. While we can provide the history of many places, we are far from experts about the specters that hang about.  

 

The Golden Stage, one of the stops on the annual Ghost Walk for the 5th graders, has a collection of stories which are added to year after year. There is a ‘traveling man” that has been seen by two owners of the Inn. He looks like Robert Redford, so not so hard to encounter. There is even a ghost cat and just very odd goings on that seem to occur year round. It’s one of our favorite stops as the list of stories continues to grow.

 

The Inn was at one time owned by the Skinner family that were heavily involved in the abolitionist movement and provided sanctuary to former slaves.

 

Crows Bakery and Opera House Café is a favorite of children spirits, who have been known to run around the place. During this year’s ghost walk, we had several students, one of whom had lived in the building, relate stories about their encounters with the children Emily, Lily and Tom. The girl ghosts liked Playdough and one of them enjoyed playing Barbie dolls.

 

Origins of Ghost Stories on Christmas Eve: Ghost stories were an integral part of Victorian England-hence Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol.” However, the ghost and spirits walking the earth at this time of year was crucial to the Yuletide-winter solstice traditions that have been practiced for centuries in northern Europe. The long nights, cold and often nasty weather, made ghost telling the perfect antidote for late December.

 

According to Jerome K. Jerome, the humorist who wrote “Told After Supper”  in 1891, Christmas Eve is the ghosts' great gala night. On Christmas Eve they hold their annual fete. On Christmas Eve everybody in Ghostland who IS anybody…comes out to show himself or herself, to see and to be seen, to promenade about and display their winding-sheets and grave-clothes to each other, to criticise one another's style, and sneer at one another's complexion….. not only do the ghosts themselves always walk on Christmas Eve, but live people always sit and talk about them on Christmas Eve. Whenever five or six English-speaking people meet round a fire on Christmas Eve, they start telling each other ghost stories. Nothing satisfies us on Christmas Eve but to hear each other tell authentic anecdotes about spectres. It is a genial, festive season, and we love to muse upon graves, and dead bodies, and murders, and blood.

There is a good deal of similarity about our ghostly experiences; but this of course is not our fault but the fault of ghosts, who never will try any new performances, but always will keep steadily to old, safe business. The consequence is that, when you have been at one Christmas Eve party, and heard six people relate their adventures with spirits, you do not require to hear any more ghost stories. To listen to any further ghost stories after that would be like sitting out two farcical comedies, or taking in two comic journals; the repetition would become wearisome.

Haints: Part of the Gullah-Geechee culture, “haints” are restless ghosts who can be malicious. One of the unique things about haints and spirits in Gullah lore is that they can be stopped by the color blue. Ever notice how some of the old Vermont Houses porch ceilings are painted blue?

 

The Gullah/Geechee Nation exist from Jacksonville, NC to Jacksonville, FL.  It encompasses all of the Sea Islands and thirty to thirty-five miles inland to the St. John’s River.  On these islands, people from numerous African ethnic groups linked with indigenous Americans and created the unique Gullah language and traditions from which later came “Geechee.”

More Holiday Ghost Stores

• 10 Spooky Ghost Stories for Christmastime  

Ghost Stories for Christmas: A chilling Victorian tradition

 

A Plea to Resurrect the Christmas Tradition of Telling Ghost Stories

 

Friday, December 11, 2020

Directions for Origami Cranes


 This week's holiday project, as part of the Cavendish Historical Society's (CHS) "hands on history," is making origami cranes. Packets of origami paper are in the CHS Cabinet (chest) portion, located next to the steps of the Museum.

In Japanese, Chinese and Korean traditions, the crane stands for good fortune and longevity. More recently is has become a symbol of hope and healing during challenging times.

 

If there’s ever been a time for hope and healing, it’s now, as many parts of the world are once again returning to lock down due to Covid-19.

 

A Japanese legend  says if you fold a 1,000 cranes you will be granted a wish by the gods. Many now know about this legend thanks to Sadako, the Japanese young girl who tried to make 1,000 cranes so she’d be healthy enough to be on her local running team. Unfortunately, she would die from leukemia, which she contracted from radiation due to the bombing of Hiroshima, before she completed 1,000 cranes. Learn more about Sadako’s story by clicking here.

Learn to make a crane by watching this video.


 

To string the crane, watch the following video.



 

While the CHS Cabinet has packets of origami paper,  you can use all sorts of paper, just as long as you create a square.

 

If you want to hang them outside, Tyvex paper works well. No need to go to your local hardware store to buy some, chances are good you may have some you can recycle from packaging materials, tags and signs, manuals, maps, safety and construction equipment, and apparel. 

 

Check out 7 ways to water proof origami


Thursday, December 10, 2020

Solzhenitsyn's Birthday-Release of Book 2 of Between Two Millstones

Solzhenitsyn & family in Cavendish
December 11 is the 102nd birthday of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.

This past month, book Two of Between Two Millstones: Exiled in America was published in English and is available from Amazon. Solzhenitsyn writes about his time in the west, which includes living in Cavendish for 18 of the 20 years he was in exile.

Below are a variety of reviews, as well as excerpts from the book.

The book was launched on Dec. 10, 2020 at the Kennan Institute, which includes a discussion by Dan Mahoney and Ignat Solzhenitsyn. You can watch the video online. 

• Between Two Millstones: Solzhenitsyn’s Exile in America 1978-1994

Book 2 of his memoirs focuses on a period of family and fruitful writing in Vermont. The American Spectator

The Wall Street Journal

Claremont Review of Books

Kirkus Reviews

The New Criterion: Gray Mists & Ancient Stones, an excerpt

The American Conservative

Foreword Reviews

Wall Street Journal

The Hudson Review

Big Other

• Letter to President Reagan National Review 

• An Encounter Sabotaged: National Review 

• Yearning for Home: National Review 

Tuesday, December 1, 2020

CHS Briefs December 1, 2020


Due to the Governor’s new restriction, resulting from a surge in Covid cases, the Christmas Ghost Walk planned for December has been cancelled. However, there will be a special Cavendish Christmas Eve Ghost Story to look forward to, featuring some of Cavendish’s better known spirits.

 

NEW AT THE CHS BLOG

•Carmine Guica Young Historians Update: Includes information for remote learners, teachers, parents etc. Contains a lot of historical information and resources for the month ahead.

 

CARMINE GUICA YOUNG HISTORIANS PROGRAM



Thank you to the CTES 6th graders: The students, faculty and staff have spent three afternoons cleaning in the Proctor Cemetery. Leaves, left on gravestones can damage the stones, so the cemetery was raked and cleaned of branches etc. They'll be back in the spring to help with the preservation of one of the town's oldest cemeteries and to lay flags on the graves of veterans.

 

 Golden Stage Inn a stop on the ghost walk

We’ve been working outside with students, including a Ghost Walk with the 6th graders and a First Peoples of Cavendish workshop for the 5th grade who are studying native American history.

 

The students have moved to remote learning for the month of December so we will not be able to do our annual holiday workshops with them. However, we made a number of hands-on history kits that students took home before the Thanksgiving holiday and are leaving kits for home school students in the Closet. We are available for Zoom meetings.

 

In January, we plan on beginning the exercise of town meeting, where just like the town, items for voting will be discussed. In February, items for the “warning,” will be finalized and distributed to the students along with the date and time of  “town meeting. In March, we will be holding a mock town meeting for the students, which like most of VT, will be conducted by Zoom. 

 


CHS CARES CLOSET
: If you or someone you know would like to receive items from the closet, but can’t get there, e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com or call 802-226-7807 with your requests for books, puzzles, craft projects, hands on history kits etc. All items will be placed on the porch, mail box or a designated spot. If you have items you’d like to donate to the Closet, please call 802-226-7807 or e-mail margocaulfield@icloud.com

 

COVID-19: CHS continues to collects items, stories etc. associated with the pandemic for archival purposes. If you have something you would like to donate, please contact us.

 

ANNUAL APPEAL: The day after Thanksgiving begins CHS’s Annual Appeal Campaign. Below is this year’s letter:

November 27, 2020

 

Dear Friend:

 

What a year! We hope that you and your family are safe and healthy.

 

CHS has risen to the Covid challenge by introducing unique programming to support our community as well as preserve our history. Not only have we been offering a number of Sunday events outside, but we now have the CHS Cares Closet. Built by two volunteers out of repurposed materials, there is an array of books, toys, hands-on history kits, puzzles as well as masks, the CHS newsletter and more. It’s been very well received by the community as everything is free and available 24/7.

 

In keeping with the new, and changing, regulations, our Young Historians program is very active. We have both home and school based learners that we are working with.. A new outreach effort, a monthly listserv-also available at the CHS blog- has been started to assist teachers, parents and students with resources and suggestions for teaching history in the upcoming months. 

 

Thanks to amazing volunteers, the door, windows, and shutters on the Cavendish Stone Church are being painted and should be completed in the spring/early summer. Definitely improves the streetscape on Main St.

 

We can’t do this without your help. You can play an integral part by

• Donating to the annual appeal campaign (see attached form), specifying how you want your contribution to be used.

• Renewing your annual membership.

• Volunteering to help with our various programs.

• Donating gently used items to the CHS Closet (please call or e-mail and we’ll make arrangements to pick up items).

• Sharing Covid journals and items that can be archived for future generations.

 

Wishing you a joyous holiday season, and a safe and happy New Year.

 

Sincerely,

 Dan Churchill, President

 

Donations for CHS can be sent to CHS, PO Box 472, Cavendish, VT 05142. Checks should be payable to the Cavendish Historical Society.